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  Resource Web
  'The Bottom of the Ocean Is "Main Street" to Him'  Article from 1925 with reminiscences of a repair ship captain on www.atlantic-cable.com. Link
5 Hole 5 hole paper tape codes. Link
AC&R AC&R (American Cable and Radio Corporation) News, Sept/Oct 1961. Article by Vic Haley about Weston-super-Mare. (A few pages of this issue in Museum archive).  
  A short history of CCC on a site dedicated to old bond and share certificates. Link
  A short History of French Trans-Atlantic Telegraph Cables on www.atlantic-cable.com. Link
Atlantic Cable History of the Atlantic Cable & Submarine Telegraphy The Commercial Cable Company by Bill Glover  on www.atlantic-cable.com. Link
Bellamy The Commercial Cable Company's cable station, Hazel hill, Nova Scotia, Canada by Chas. Bellamy, superintendent in 1927. This is now available here
Bill McLaughlin Bill McLaughlin. Personal communication.
Bob Abrams Bob Abrams (retired CCC employee), personal communication
Bright

Bright, Charles. Submarine Telegraphs. London, Crosby Lockwood and Son 1898. (Loan from White family.)

Cableships Cableships and Submarine Cables, K R Haigh, 1968. Publ. by Adlard Coles Ltd and United States Underseas Cable Corporation.
Chris Knight Chris Knight, private communication.  
Dibner "The Atlantic Cable" by Bern Dibner Link
De Cogan Dr Donard de Cogan C.Eng., FIEE of the School of Information Systems University of East Anglia - private communications and The Commercial Cable Company and their Waterville station, presented at an IEE History of Technology weekend at Trinity College, Dublin, July 1987. Link
  George White, papers etc. Full archive click here.
  History of the Atlantic Cable & Submarine Telegraphy, Cableship Stamps . Information about some of the cable-laying ships. Link
Cyber-museum Internet On-Line Telegraph & Scientific Instrument Cyber-Museum, Prof Tom Perera  Pictures of cable construction of old cables recovered from the sea-bed. Link
  Internet Valley - a chronology of Telegraph, Telephone and Radiotelephone, the three services reaching across the Atlantic before the 1960 Echo satellite.  Link
Jim Hewison Jim Hewison. Jim was 88 years old in 2005 grew up at Waterville Cable Station but never worked there. (His father did.) He has given me much information for this site.
  John McVey (currently Assistant Professor of Design Montserrat College of Art Beverly, Massachusetts), who is interested in telegraph codes and passed me a copy of a CCC code book from 1928. Link
John Packer John Packer, Curator of the Porchcurno Museum of Submarine Telegraphy
Ken Ward Ken Ward, private communication.  
Library Newspaper cuttings and notes in Weston-super-Mare Town Library.
Olga Davis Olga (Davis) Neal, personal communication  
Oral Hist Oral history article from the IEE. Link
Margaret Brown Margaret Brown, Waterville.
Mike Harding Mike Harding, private communication.  
North Somerset Museum Papers in North Somerset Museum, Weston-super-Mare. Their cable archive is available on-line.
Routing Cables "Routing the cables" from the IEE website. Link (PDF)
Splicing Splicing a cable. See link. Link
  The Cable Ships of Turnchapel. by John G. Avery. This book has many details and anecdotes about the CCC cable ships operating from Plymouth. Beech Books, 2 Beech Court, Beech Avenue, Southampton SO18 4TS. John also has commemorative postcards of the Mackay-Bennett.  
The Sea Board of Mendip The Sea-Board of Mendip, Francis A Knight. First published 1902 and republished in 1988 by the Alis Press.
  West Cork Leader  Link
  Weston-super-Mare in Old Photographs, Sharon Poole, Alan Sutton Publishing Ltd 1987
Further research required
Questions
When did the (land) telegraph first come to Weston?
Cables from Weston to London. Route? Buried or on poles?
  Chris Knight responds: "I've posed that question to my mate who joined CCC some years earlier than myself and he has informed me that he thinks they went underground as were the cables that landed down that way from the Med. and continent."
When was Waterville station built?
Where did the cables land on Weston front?
Chris Lewton reports: "As far as I am aware the cables landed roughly in line with the cable station: the building on the seafront you have a photo of was nothing to do with them that I know of. They were well buried under the mud and sand and came under the promenade and then under the footpath at the front of 3 Richmond St and actually entered the building on the landside end wall, going up a duct to the cableheads on the first floor where they were connected to the equipment. There were also sea-earths for each cable that also went out into the bay to give as interference-free as possible an earth connection. I have never heard of any salvage of the abandoned cables. I doubt it would have been worth the scrap metal returns."
Where are the troops (ie in what building) guarding the cable at Weston?

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John Crellin 2007