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Extract from "Submarine Telegraphs" by Charles Bright FRSE 1898

from pages 672 and 673

   Other Transmitters.—Besides the automatic transmitting instruments and systems which we have here described, there are also several others which, it is believed, have similarly proved highly satisfactory. For instance, Mr T. J. Wilmot in 1890 brought out an automatic instrument, being - like the Belz-Brahic, the early Taylor "automatic," and others - a neat modification of Wheatstone's adapted to recorder, for cable work, instead of Morse signals, by alterations in the form of the levers. Then there is the transmitter of Mr Charles Cuttriss (electrician to the Commercial cable Company in New York), the great feature of which is that the prepared transmitting paper takes indentations instead of holes from the punching apparatus. Both of these mechanical transmitters have been, and are, largely used on the Commercial Company's cables.*


FIG. 133.—Wilmot's Automatic Transmitter.

In 1893 Dr Alexander Muirhead and Mr H. A. C. Saunders joined hands over another curb transmitter (in the form of an automatic key)


FIG. 134.—The Cuttriss Transmitter.

worked on a somewhat different principle, but this apparatus requires extremely regular transmission of a special kind, and there is some difficulty in ensuring this.

   * Mr Wilmot, the above company's superintendent at Waterville, was one of the very first workers in the field of automatic telegraphy. His apparatus was soon recognised as being a successful solution to its application for cables. The Wilmot transmitter is not furnished with any curbing device, the inventor being one of those who consider that by using condensers all the required curbing effect is afforded. A general view of this instrument is given in Fig. 133, and the like representation of that of Mr Cuttriss in Fig. 134.

© John Crellin 2009

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